An Author Takes on a Project

This is the second post in a blog series about one Winterthur Fellow’s experience in the Winterthur Fellowship Program

From my fellowship application: As the author of the Captain Jane Thorn historical maritime fiction series, I have two main goals: the first is, of course, to entertain the reader; the second is to introduce the reader to the world of the 1820s and the reality of maritime trade. I strive to base the books on actual people and events, including the documented voyages of trading vessels, as a way to make history come alive…

My aim with this project is twofold: in the first instance, I will be building a resource for my own use as I continue the book series; secondly, I will be creating a resource that both makes the log data available to all researchers, and brings together other resources at the Winterthur that add depth and color to the log data. For example, the log of a barkentine’s trip to China will include transcripts of the logs, plotted map coordinates, images of the logbooks themselves, images of a barkentine, images of the captain if available, and so on. This database will be created through Google Earth and may be made available publicly through Winterthur. Thus, materials in the archives (primarily the Joseph Downs Collection of Printed Ephemera) may become not only available online, but will include context.

A number of researchers have taken on the task of transcribing ship’s log data in the past. Most well-known is the Maury data. Lt. Matthew Maury, first superintendent of the US Naval Observatory (1842 to 1861), worked on abstracting old logbooks to create atlases and charts intended to improve shipping routes. His greatest contribution was a logbook template, used widely by printers around the country, that arranged entries in accordance with rules that enable standardized selection and abstraction of the data. The proposed project will build on the standards set for both the Maury data and other digitization projects such as Old Weather, but will include additional resources and information that makes the data more useful for writers and humanities researchers.

A cool thing I found in the Collection:

The fact was, you had a pretty good chance of dying at sea in 1804. For the average seaman, that meant having your personal possessions auctioned off to the rest of the crew. It strikes me how little “Nelson” left behind.

Post by Pamela F. Wik-Grimm, Maker/Creator Research Fellow, Winter 2020

Pamela Wik-Grimm writes historical maritime fiction based on her lifelong love of sailing and the sea. She holds a USCG captain’s license and is active as a commercial and recreational sailor. http://www.pamelagrimmauthor.com


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